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Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Religious congregations and welfare reform found in the catalog.

Religious congregations and welfare reform

Mark Chaves

Religious congregations and welfare reform

who will take advantage of "charitable choice"

by Mark Chaves

  • 381 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Nonprofit Sector Research Fund in [Washington, DC] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Public welfare -- United States.,
    • Public welfare -- Religious aspects.,
    • Church and social problems -- United States.,
    • Church charities -- United States.,
    • Religious institutions -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementMark Chaves.
      SeriesWorking paper series, Working paper series (Nonprofit Sector Research Fund)
      ContributionsNonprofit Sector Research Fund.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV95 .C425 1999
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 20 p. ;
      Number of Pages20
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3640914M
      LC Control Number2002449856
      OCLC/WorldCa44435487

      In the wake of welfare reform, many states have considered utilizing local religious communities as a point of social service delivery for relief previously offered through state entitlement programs. The Washington, D.C., policy research group the Urban Institute convened a roundtable on J , to mark the 10th anniversary of welfare reform. At the event, experts with varied views acknowledged the watershed transformation of public assistance for very poor people and offered suggestions to further promote well-being for the economically vulnerable.

      The possibility of utilizing religious congregations to provide social services previously borne by the state stems from the "charitable choice" portion of the welfare reform law. Under the welfare reform bill signed by President Clinton last year, America's , congregations will be allowed to establish taxpayer-funded counseling, job-training, and day-care programs.

        (Seth Wenig/AP Photo) I t is commonplace to complain about government mismanagement of welfare and social reform, and to speak wistfully of days when religious institutions did much better. Yet if we look back to the moment when the state began to take on some responsibility for those in need, what is most striking is the relief, and even enthusiasm, that many religious leaders . For people living in U.S. cities, social services come not only from the government but increasingly also from local religious communities. Ever since the Clinton administration's welfare reform, faith-based institutions, and especially congregations, have been allowed to bid for federal funds for their by:


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Religious congregations and welfare reform by Mark Chaves Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rising Expectations examines the current attempts to enlist religious congregations as partners in social services and community development. It highlights stark demographic realities about urban congregations in order to challenge current assumptions about welfare reform and Cited by: In the current Code of Canon Law, the word "congregation" is never used of a class of religious institutes, but only of the congregations of the Roman Curia or of monastic congregations.

In the English translation of the Canon Law Society of America, the word "congregation" is used also in canon §§2–3 of the people at Mass, where the. Rising Expectations: Urban Congregations, Welfare Reform, and Civic Life The book examines the shaping of religious traditions by the changing city.

It sheds light on issues such as social capital and faithbased welfare reform and explores the countervailing pressures of “decentering”—the creation of multiple (sub)urban centers—and. His previous work on this subject includes “Religious Congregations and Welfare Reform: Who Will Take Advantage of ‘Charitable Choice’?” American Sociological Review 64 (December): –, ; and “Congregations' Social Service Activities.”Cited by: It is the idea that religious congregations and faith-based nonprofit organizations are much better at delivering social services locally than the welfare bureaucracy.

The legislation not only ended welfare as we knew it, but it also sent the design and delivery of welfare services to states and localities with an assumption that the. Book Description: Ranging from the Reagan years to the present -- a crucial period in both social welfare policy development and the history of religious involvement in social services -- A Limited Partnership explores an important undercurrent in the new welfare policy.

Robert Wineburg argues that the present policy, with its emphasis on services increasingly being delivered by the faith. A Limited Partnership [Wineburg, Bob] on Religious congregations and welfare reform book shipping on qualifying offers.

Ranging from the Reagan years to the present―a crucial period in both social welfare policy development and the history of religious involvement in social services― A Limited Partnership explores an important undercurrent in the new welfare by: Mark Chaves is professor and head of the sociology department at the University of Arizona and principal investigator of the National Congregations Study.

He is the author of “Ordaining Women: Culture and Conflict in Religious Organizations” (Harvard University Press, ). Recent publications include “Religious Congregations and Welfare Reform: Who Will Take Advantage of ‘Charitable.

Welfare re- form has also substantially altered the condi- tions under which religious organizations in general, and religious congregations in par- ticular, may deliver publicly supported social services to the poor. Section of the welfare reform legislation contains a. "Cnaan uses a unique, thorough field study of nearly congregations in Philadelphia to probe the issue of social service delivery through religious institutions The book will be useful for graduate courses in social welfare and religion, and to scholars in both fields.

Highly recommended."—Choice. FIRST OF THREE PARTS Churches, homeless shelters and religious charities are being asked to perform a miracle -- to make welfare reform work. Two years. Religious groups constitute a large part of America's voluntary sector, yet relatively few works have investigated them broadly.

This collection of essays investigates the public roles of religious congregations and associations. With contributions by premier social scientists, the work gets to the bottom of how effective—or ineffective—religious groups are in offering social services. Among other projects, he directs the National Congregations Study (NCS), a wide-ranging survey of a nationally representative sample of religious congregations conducted in, and NCS results have helped us to better understand many aspects of congregational life in the United States.

The book will be useful for graduate courses in social welfare and religion, and to scholars in both fields. Highly recommended.”—Choice Many of the problems associated with urban life persist in the face of governmental inaction, and the burden of responsibility cannot be shouldered entirely by congregations.

Book Description: Congregations and faith-based organizations have become key participants in America's welfare revolution. Recent legislation has expanded the social welfare role of religious communities, thus revealing a pervasive lack of faith in purely economic responses to able Choices is an ethnographic study of faith-based poverty relief in 30 congregations in the rural south.

Presents a study of religious congregations that poses a challenge to key assumptions about welfare reform. This book also deals with the three basic assumptions. Religion and Social Policy explores how religious concerns influence those who shape and those who are shaped by policies.

It queries the social teachings of global denominations and local congregations, as well as the implicit religious stances taken by national governments and international NGOs. In the wake of welfare reform, many states-including Mississippi-have considered utilizing religious congregations as a provider of services to the needy.

The possibility of utilizing religious congregations to provide social services previously borne by the state stems from the "charitable choice" portion of the welfare reform law. This study examines the feasibility of implementing. With regard to religious congregations, although they primarily tend to be houses of worship, they may be classified as “faith-based organizations” if they provide social File Size: KB.

Congregations and faith-based organizations have become key participants in America's welfare revolution. Recent legislation has expanded the social welfare role of religious communities, thus revealing a pervasive lack of faith in purely economic responses to poverty.

The book examines the shaping of religious traditions by the changing city. It sheds light on issues such as social capital and faith-based welfare reform and explores the countervailing pressures of “decentering”—the creation of multiple (sub)urban centers—and civil religion’s role in binding these centers into one metropolis.Religious organizations are key players in providing for community social welfare needs, both congregations and faith-based organizations, as well as contributing to the national level policy discourse.

To understand the role of congregations in social welfare provision, this project presents a case study of congregations in a small U.S. city. Welfare reform has triggered experimentation by states, which are responsible for its administration, and copious research about what works.

In this search for effective answers, the prevailing way of thinking about welfare and poverty has also cast a spotlight on religious congregations and the potential support they provide. Amy Sherman of the Hudson Institute, who has.